Clean water

gift of water

If you’re reading this, you’re probably old enough to hear what I’m about to say.

Santa is not real.

Alright, so you’ve probably heard that one before, but here are some similar hoaxes we all seem to buy into long into adulthood:

1. Water is everywhere and it comes from nature so it should be free.

2. Water will always flow magically from my faucet and hose.

One of the primary reasons I left a promising position with a leading software company to come work for Weathermatic was because of the commitment from the Weathermatic leadership team to serve our community and world.  I have the privilege of helping lead this effort at Weathermatic through Save Water | Give Life.  We donate $1 per month for each SmartLink connection and part of our Sustainability Services revenue to clean water projects around the world.  

Saving water is a way of life for me.  As a water management solution provider, every day I speak to professional landscape and property management companies responsible for billions of gallons of water about progressive methods of saving our most precious resource.  For what purpose?  The obvious – saving water saves money and creates a more sustainable environment for our health, safety, economy, landscape, and bottom line.

Here at Weathermatic, we know the importance of saving our customers water. However, we are immeasurably fortunate to have water for irrigation and drinking. Worldwide, nearly one billion people cannot access clean drinking water, and it keeps them sick, impoverished, uneducated, and oppressed.

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